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The Fallacy of Uttering: “We know how it ends!”

The Fallacy of Uttering: “We know how it ends!”

Wars. They’re ugly. People die. Many more are wounded. Destruction abounds. And there are often many battles before the war is won. 

Some wars can last years. In fact, America is still engaged in our longest war. We’ve been fighting in Afghanistan for nearly 20 years, and many good men and women have died, and even more wounded. 

Imagine for a moment the following fictional conversation between two soldiers, Bob and John:

“Hey Bob, we’re headed out again tonight on a secret mission. I’m told it will be very dangerous with the likelihood that some of us may not return.  Are you ready?”

“Well John, I’ve been thinking about the mission and while it could be important, I think I’m gonna pass. I know how it ends. We win! They lose! Plus, I might be killed in the battle. So I’m gonna hang out back here, grab some pizza, and play my favorite video game: Call of Duty. But my thoughts are with ya John!  And remember, “we win!”

Any soldier who would say something as stupid and cowardly as what Bob said above would be quickly shamed, perhaps even court-martialed.  Imagine exchanging the real life and death battle that John was gearing up for, and instead choosing a fantasy battle, inside a virtual video game.  Bob, our imaginary soldier, wouldn’t be fit to wear the uniform. 

If you’re a follower of Jesus, you’re a soldier. No, not a physical one with guns and bayonets. But you are engaged in a real battle that is part of a greater war, for all the marbles. Jesus is our Captain, in the war of the ages, between Heaven and hell, God and Satan. 

Too often though, particularly in America, I hear many of the members of Jesus’s army exclaiming what Bob said above. We see the continued slide of our culture into the abyss and we exclaim, “we know how it ends.”  We quote our favorite prophetic verses, believing that Jesus will just swoop down and pluck us out of this mess we call the world. So we slump into our comfy Lazyboys, and fancy ourselves Saturday night quarterbacks, for the Super Bowl on Sunday. We arrogantly believe we know how it will all play out.  Meanwhile, the angels in heaven don’t even know!!

And guess what. You don’t know either. While we are told to watch for the return of Jesus, we don’t know when He will appear. For the last 2,000 years, believers have routinely reasoned that Jesus would return in their lifetimes. But can you imagine if the great believers of past centuries had all sat back and remain disengaged, citing “we know how it ends.”  If they had, you and I might not be here today. Or at least, we might not know Jesus. 

So, if you’ve ever said (like me) “I know how it ends,” what should you instead be saying and doing?

Thankfully, we have God’s Word to instruct us on the proper response a believer should have in the midst of a “crooked and perverse world.”  One of my favorite passage tells us this:

“Do everything without complaining and arguing, so that no one can criticize you. Live clean, innocent lives as children of God, shining like bright lights in a world full of crooked and perverse people. Hold firmly to the word of life; then, on the day of Christ’s return, I will be proud that I did not run the race in vain and that my work was not useless. But I will rejoice even if I lose my life, pouring it out like a liquid offering to God, just like your faithful service is an offering to God. And I want all of you to share that joy.” Philippians 2:14-17 

Additionally, if you’re a soldier for Jesus, the Apostle Paul has this word of instruction for you:

“Join with me in suffering, like a good soldier of Christ Jesus. No one serving as a soldier gets entangled in civilian affairs, but rather tries to please his commanding officer.” 2 Timothy 2:3-4 

From just these passages we see a few suggestions on how we should be living:Complaining or arguing is not an option.

➖Live clean, innocent lives

➖Shine as a bright light (in a dark world)

➖Hold firmly to God’s Word (which means we should be in it more than anything else)

➖Be joyful if you lose your life for God

➖Expect suffering if you’re serving Jesus

➖Don’t get tied up with the things of this world

Is this it?  Not at all. But it’s a good start, particularly if you’ve fallen for the “we know how it ends” mentality. The truth is, the “end” that we like to refer to may not occur during your lifetime or mine. So do you want to be “tied up in the affairs of this world” or serving God wholeheartedly?  

Perhaps we should live in the light of the fact that “our end” may come sooner than “the end.”  Are we living in such a way that when we take our final breath, we will hear the words “well done good and faithful servant?”

If God has spoken to you about the importance of living for Jesus as if your very life, and those around you, depended on it, I would encourage you to read and mediate on the entire chapter of Romans 12. This one chapter perhaps encapsulates how a follower of Jesus should live, in a crooked and perverse world. 

Read Romans 12 here: “Therefore, I urge you, brothers and sisters, in view of God’s mercy, to offer your bodies as a living sacrifice…

 

The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil…?

The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil…?

“The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing!”

True or False?

I’ve referenced this quote hundreds of times. And a poll concluded that the quote is the most popular one of modern times.  Americans wholeheartedly embrace it. 

But what if I told you the quote is neither Scriptural, nor inspired.  Truthfully, it promotes a very humanistic view of the world.

Yes, this famous quote is anti-biblical for a number of reasons. 

So am I suggesting good men should do nothing?  

OF COURSE NOT!

But I am saying that we too often accept as “gospel truth” what our traditions teach us, our parents pass down, or our culture inculcates. 

In this case, there is pressure from the statement itself because no one wants to be a bad man, so to be a “good man” we must do something.  Then, our traditions, our peers, or our echo-chambers, are all there to tell us what we must do. 

But I’m getting ahead of myself. Let’s dissect what’s wrong with the quote from a biblical standpoint.

1️⃣ First, evil at times does triumph (temporarily), even at God’s command or order, for His greater purposes.  (Hold on… read on.)

2️⃣ Second, at times good men are told, by God, to stand down, to do nothing, and to let evil triumph (momentarily).  In fact, we are told that at times, fighting evil is akin to fighting against God.  (Keep reading…)

3️⃣ Third, the quote implies that “nothing” equals not doing something.  So it is a call to “action.”  One must do something.  But “not acting” is not the same as “not doing.”

Now let me reiterate, THIS IS NOT A CALL TO DO NOTHING.  But it is a challenge to go to God’s Word to see what God has to say about evil, what He might be doing, and what our role is in responding to it.  So let’s look at the three points above in greater detail.

1️⃣ First, when we suggest “evil triumphs” we have a very short sighted understanding of triumph. We fail to understand that our ways and thoughts are not God’s ways and thoughts. We ignore the truth that for God, a day is like a thousand years and a thousand years is like a day (2 Peter 3:8). There is no ultimate triumphing of evil. There is only what God sovereignly allows, or causes, momentarily.  I will share a story from the Old Testament in just a bit, but let’s look at the second point from above.

2️⃣ At times, good men are told, by God, to stand down and to do nothing, as in take no action.  As a result, evil will triumph (momentarily).  What???  You mean God allows, or causes , what we call evil and then He asks us to not act?  Yep.  He absolutely does as Scripture reveals.  While we will never fully understand God’s thoughts or ways (He Himself tells us this) we can study what He does and begin to conclude How He acts, at times. 

The Old Testament is replete with stories that give us a peek into who God is and how He acts.  I’ll cite just one.  The southern kingdom of Israel, called Judah, had regularly strayed from God, throughout its existence.  As a result, God ultimately punished it by bringing a foreign power to conquer it and take its citizens into captivity.  The following passages tells us what was going to happen, why it would happen, and what Judah’s response should be:

“Now Zedekiah king of Judah had imprisoned him there, saying, “Why do you prophesy as you do? You say, ‘This is what the Lord says: I am about to give this city into the hands of the king of Babylon, and he will capture it. Zedekiah king of Judah will not escape the Babylonians but will certainly be given into the hands of the king of Babylon, and will speak with him face to face and see him with his own eyes. He will take Zedekiah to Babylon, where he will remain until I deal with him, declares the Lord. If you fight against the Babylonians, you will not succeed.’” Jeremiah 32:3-5

Continuing with this additional passage, the evil that was coming was described, and yet Judah was to not resist:

“I am the Lord, the God of all mankind. Is anything too hard for me? Therefore this is what the Lord says: I am about to give this city into the hands of the Babylonians and to Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon, who will capture it. The Babylonians who are attacking this city will come in and set it on fire; they will burn it down, along with the houses where the people aroused my anger by burning incense on the roofs to Baal and by pouring out drink offerings to other gods. “The people of Israel and Judah have done nothing but evil in my sight from their youth; indeed, the people of Israel have done nothing but arouse my anger with what their hands have made, declares the Lord.” Jeremiah 32:27-30

So God tells His people that an evil power was going to triumph over them (which they brought on themselves).  And they were told that if they fought against that power, they would not succeed.  How does that reconcile with the famous quote above?

3️⃣ Our role is to listen to our Captain to determine what, if anything, we are to do.  From Judah, we learn that there are times when TO ACT IS TO SIN.  As Americans, this is a tough principle to accept.  We are action oriented.  So when God tells us to “be still” or to not act (do nothing), it goes against the grain of who we are as a people. 

“Not acting” though is not the same as “not doing.” There is a time to act, and a time not to act. But there is one “do” that we should never cease from doing. It is the most powerful “doing” you can ever undertake, and it will guide and empower you when you are finally called to rise up and act.  The do that is more important than any action is this: “Pray without ceasing.1 Thessalonians 5:17

Our first, and overriding, response to evil should always be prayer. This is the greatest weapon any believer can have when faced with evil.  Yet how often do we either forget, or we don’t really consider this as “doing?”  When was the last time you or I sweat drops of blood, or just shed tears of anguish, for the evil we were confronting?  Jesus did.

Evil is spiritual. Prayer is spiritual. The battle is always spiritual. So we must start, and finish, there:  Prayer!

At the end of the day, all evil is only vanquished spiritually.  This is not to say that we cannot, or should not take practical, physical steps to address evil.  But when doing so, it should only be as we are directly commanded or called to do such.  And we should never believe the other false parallel quote that states, “if it’s to be, it’s up to me.”  

When evil is defeated, it’s always a God thing.  We see this in another famous story in the Old Testament, involving a man named Gideon.  God pared Gideon’s army down from 32,000 men to only 300.  God then took that band of men, equipped them with lamps and trumpets, and told them to just blow their instruments and shout.  No swords, slingshots, or physical weapons.  Just men who trusted and obeyed God.  And God told them why He used such an unconventional manner to defeat the evil in their midst:

“The Lord said to Gideon, “You have too many men. I cannot deliver Midian into their hands, or Israel would boast against me, ‘My own strength has saved me.’” Judges 7:2

Sadly, men are prideful beings.  We love to take credit for good.  But if there is any good that occurs, or if evil is defeated, it is only God.  First, middle and last.  We might be a tool to achieve that defeat, or we might not.  

But to boil down evil and why it occurs and “triumphs” to a simple humanistic explanation of “good men doing nothing” ignores all of the Bible and tempts you and me to act first, and pray or consider God last, if at all.  This quote would have you believe that to do less, or different, makes you a “bad man” and insures the defeat of good, which means God (since God is good).

God cannot be defeated.  Nor is His future dependent on your strength or action.  What He desires is for you and me to be so close to Him, that when He commands us to be still, we hear Him.  And when He commands us to shout, we shout!  

But in the meantime, those who call Jesus their Savior should start with “Pray without ceasing.”

America: A Grumbling Nation

America: A Grumbling Nation

Complaining, griping and fretting.  This has become the overarching theme of a nation which has been blessed in such extraordinary ways. Yet, Americans live to grumble. 

We breathe in fresh air. And exhale polluted expletives. 

We inhale God’s gift of life. And exhale words of death, for to hate is to kill. And there is a pandemic of hate in the hearts of Americans. 

How can this be?  Why have we become such an ungrateful people?  Why do we feel we must make every wrong right?  And why do we arrogantly believe that everyone else is wrong, and we are right?  

Have we become so self-righteous that we are fooled into believing that our neighbor’s sins are greater than ours?  Or worse yet, that we have no sins?  

Could it be that Jesus was wrong?  Is the speck in our neighbor’s eye actually bigger and worse than the log in our own?  Should we fix the other guy’s eye first so we can see our own blindness better?

Is it possible that we have it all wrong?  Has the enemy (Satan), that old serpent also known as the father of all lies, deceived us so greatly that we define wrong or right, by the color of one’s politics, or perhaps even their skin? In so doing, have we forgotten the truth of the passage that reminds us that “man looks on the outward appearance but God looks on the heart?”  

If the heart is where God looks, should we not also look at our own hearts?  Should we not continuously examine ourselves?  Should the mirror not be one of our greatest allies in identifying our greatest enemy, and seeking to control and master him or her first?  

As parents we do our best to give our children that which will make their lives better, in order to give them the greatest opportunity for success and happiness.  Yet, if the response of our children was continuous grumbling and complaining about everything that was imperfect in their world, would we not undoubtedly feel hurt, disappointed, and even dejected by their attitudes?

Now consider God, our Heavenly Father, the model of perfection.  He has given each of us so much, and yet we so often respond in such an ungrateful way.  Rather than thanksgiving, we are full of grumbling about our circumstances, griping about our neighbor, complaining about our government, or boss, or culture, or anything else that is less than what our unrealistic expectations demand. 

How must God feel?  What must His response be?  Could He grow “weary” with our thankless attitudes, despite the fact that we live in the midst of one of the greatest array of options, freedoms, and wealth in the history of mankind?  

Can you imagine what the billions of other people on this globe must think about our pitiful attitudes, as they scratch out a meager existence in squalor, dirt, and mud?

What shame we should feel.  If that shame were to lead to guilt, perhaps we would fall on our knees and confess our sin to our Creator, the One who has freely given us innumerable blessings, unknown to all of mankind before us.  

Could you and I turn our ungratefulness into true, lasting thanksgiving?  What if every time we were tempted to complain, about literally anything, we instead broke out in song?  What if we simply understood that while we will undoubtedly have struggles, even in the midst of plenty, that God is still with us, that He will never forsake us, and that He is using our struggles to better refine us into the men and women He can use for His glory, and our good?  

So could we change course?  Could we be thankful instead of grumbling? Could we express gratitude instead of griping?  And could we love in place of hate?  

The answer is a resounding Yes.  But it will only happen if we exchange our broken spirits with the Holy Spirit.  Because to love is not natural.  Only as the God who is love invades our minds and hearts, can we overcome that which is natural for us, with that which is natural for God.  

So will you join me?  Let’s transform our nation, beginning with the one we see each day in the mirror.  After all, he is the only person I can control, and he is the only one for which I will ultimately be held accountable someday, as I stand individually before God. 

“Do everything without grumbling or arguing, so that you may become blameless and pure, “children of God without fault in a warped and crooked generation.” Then you will shine among them like stars in the sky as you hold firmly to the word of life. And then I will be able to boast on the day of Christ that I did not run or labor in vain.” Philippians 2:14-16 

Privilege: A Christian Response

Privilege: A Christian Response

Privilege: A Christian Response

Privilege. It’s a word that has become mainstream today. But before we examine how this word is used today, let’s visit the definition, from the Webster’s Dictionary in 1828:

In its simplest definition, privilege is an “advantage, favor or benefit.” But, in a more detailed explanation, privilege is “a particular and peculiar benefit or advantage enjoyed by a person, company or society, beyond the common advantages of other citizens… Any peculiar benefit or advantage, right or immunity, not common to others of the human race. Thus we speak of national privileges, and civil and political privileges, which we enjoy above other nations.” 

So “privilege” is not necessarily bad. But neither is it something that we normally bring about for ourselves. Rather, most often, privilege is something we are given by others, or inherited, or find ourselves enjoying apart from anything we have explicitly done. 

National Privileges

For instance, I am an American, and you probably are too. Most of us never did anything explicitly to become an American. It was a privilege we were given as a result of our birth in this land. And with that birth, and nationality, come innumerable “privileges.”  If you doubt this, travel outside our borders, and you will quickly understand the inherent privileges you and I enjoy as Americans.

But all Americans are not equally privileged. My last name isn’t Gates, or Bezos; nor is it Rockefeller, Bush, or Obama. But on the other end of the spectrum, neither was I born to a single mom, living on government subsidies, and my father wasn’t AWOL in my life either. 

I’m grateful for my family, my upbringing, and the “privileges” that have been afforded to me, through little doing of my own.

Skin Colors

I also recognize that my skin color may advantage me in some ways over other skin colors, at least in this present era. But again, I had nothing directly to do with that reality. Of course, neither did you choose your skin pigmentation. Rather, God, in His perfect wisdom, decided our skin color before the foundations of the world.  And He knew the privileges we would enjoy, or lack, stemming from our skin color. 

So privilege is real. But it is also subjective to some extent. But what do I mean by subjective?  As I said earlier, many, or most, privileges are things we enjoy in spite of our own doing: our nationality, skin color, the family we are born into, etc. But how we perceive privilege is often through our own subjective responses. 

Privilege Shaming

In this present era, privilege is frequently used to shame and even punish folks.  The most common use of the word, that has grown in popularity in our nation, is “white privilege.”  This phrase is regularly used as a hammer to beat those whose skin is white, to make them feel ashamed for certain realities in our nation, and privileges they might enjoy. 

Those realities exist. And they may “advantage” certain folks over others. Of course we should seek to level playing fields, as much as possible. But employing shame as one’s preferred strategy is not likely to convince reasonable people of the need for change. Sometimes forests need to be cleared. But using a dull ax is a very poor way to tackle the job, both for the tree, and the one swinging the ax. 

No Political Solutions

So what is the solution? 

Whenever I look at societal problems, my immediate response is to discount the solutions being proposed by politicians, or activists, or the media. This is because most societal struggles flow from spiritual realities. And there are no political solutions to spiritual problems

So because of this truth, I choose to look to God, and His strategies, to solve what man cannot. 

Responses to Privilege

When we see someone else enjoying a privilege we don’t enjoy, what is our first response?  Do we envy them?  Do we shout “unfair?”  Do we demand those same privileges?  Do we attempt to shame others for benefiting in ways we wish we could?  Or do we at least stop and look at the privileges we enjoy, compared to others who don’t enjoy what we do? 

We all know folks who enjoy privileges that vastly exceed the ones we do. But if we are honest with ourselves, we too have received privileges that exceed those of others as well, no matter who we are. Do we ever ask ourselves what will we do with the privileges we have been given, through no merit of our own?

As I read God’s Word, there are many responses a follower of Jesus should have when thinking about the reality of privileges others enjoy and we don’t, or privileges we enjoy and others don’t. Here are a few to consider:

  • Contentment.  As a Roman citizen, the Apostle Paul theoretically enjoyed the privileges of that citizenship. But he was routinely deprived of those privileges, in the most brutal and inhumane ways. However, Paul’s response in Philippians 4:11 is a classic lesson for those who claim “Christian” as their identity: For I have learned in whatever state I am, to be content.”
  • Don’t show favoritism ourselves. It’s easy to see the sin in others, while we are often blind to our own sin, or rationalize it away. So if we are upset about privileges offered to others, do we do the same ourselves?  Note what we read in James 2:3-4, 9: “If you show special attention to the man wearing fine clothes and say, “Here’s a good seat for you,” but say to the poor man, “You stand there” or “Sit on the floor by my feet,” have you not discriminated among yourselves and become judges with evil thoughts? But if you show favoritism, you sin and are convicted by the law as lawbreakers.”
  • Don’t envy others. The Bible is full of verses that warn against envy.  While many privileges are unjust, if our hearts are envious over privileges that others enjoy (because we don’t) then we have sinned. Note what Titus 3:3 says: “For we also once were foolish ourselves, disobedient, deceived,  …spending our life in malice and envy, hateful, hating one another.” 
  • Don’t hold grudges but rather forgive those who might mistreat you, or grant advantages to others over you.  In one of the greatest examples of forgiveness ever, Jesus cried out to his abusers and murderers, “Father, forgive them for they know not what they do.”  But, in our human frailty, we might look at Jesus as “super-human” since he was both God and man. So let’s consider the response of Stephen, just a short time after the ascension of Jesus. This man had been called upon by the early church leaders to assist in settling some claims by the early believers that certain widows were being discriminated against (in essence other widows had greater privileges).  The relevant part of Stephen’s story though is that he was falsely accused by unbelievers.  As he was being stoned to death, his last words were “Lord do not hold this sin against them.”  What amazing forgiveness, even while being mistreated and martyred.
  • Don’t be a rabble rouser.  Followers of Jesus should never be known as people who create dissension, seek retribution, or gripe and grumble. The Apostle Paul again reminds us: “Do everything without grumbling or arguing…” (Philippians 2:14). Also, in Titus 3:2 we read: “They must not slander anyone and must avoid quarreling. Instead, they should be gentle and show true humility to everyone.”  Finally, James 3:18 says this: “And those who are peacemakers will plant seeds of peace and reap a harvest of righteousness.”
  • Consider the needs of others before your own (because Jesus did).  This is a hard thing to do.  We all have needs of our own.  But Paul reminds us of this in Philippians 2:3-4, “Do nothing out of selfish ambition or vain conceit. Rather, in humility value others above yourselves, not looking to your own interests but each of you to the interests of the others.” And again in Titus 3:14 we read this: “Our people must learn to do good by meeting the urgent needs of others; then they will not be unproductive.”
  • Seek Justice by doing what you can in your own “world” to level things.  You may not be able to rectify the injustices of the world, your nation, or society, but you can examine your own heart and actions to see where you might be able to offer justice to those you personally touch.  The Apostle Paul once again reminds us of this principle in 1 Timothy 6:17-18, “Teach those who are rich in this world not to be proud and not to trust in their money, which is so unreliable. Their trust should be in God, who richly gives us all we need for our enjoyment. Tell them to use their money to do good. They should be rich in good works and generous to those in need, always being ready to share with others.” Regardless of the relative value of our portfolio, we can all be “rich in good works” to those whose privileges are fewer and who might have been victims of injustice.
  • Don’t flaunt the privileges you might enjoy.  In a world that elevates “self” and thrives on selfies, and boastful achievements, it’s easy to fall under the spirit of pride.  Yet, God reminds us over and over that He puts down the proud and elevates the humble.  If God, in His sovereign ways, extended privileges to us that exceed that of others, we should be careful to remain humble, and make every effort to share the blessings that come from those privileges.
  • The Perfect Judge.  God is aware of every injustice that exists, and as the Perfect Judge, He will meet out the perfect response, in His own perfect time.  “Don’t grumble about each other, brothers and sisters, or you will be judged. For look—the Judge is standing at the door!” (James 5:9)  If you possess privileges that exceed that of the average person, realize you will be judged by God in how you invested those privileges. “To whom much is given much will be required.”

A Privileged People

In the Bible, the Jewish people were known as a “privileged” people when God, for His unique reasons, chose them, a small, insignificant people, and made of them a great nation. Through them God chose to bring forth His Son two thousand years ago.  While we are told God does not show favoritism, we do know that He singled out Israel for some very unique blessings and purposes. But God also extended innumerable blessings to the rest of mankind, through the unique relationship He forged with Israel. 

Privilege is something that has existed from the beginning of time. We all will never enjoy equal privileges. But if we are followers of God, we are called to “act justly, show mercy, and walk humbly with our God.” (Micah 6:8)  

As we think through God’s role in privileges, and how we are called to respond, I pray that the above thoughts will not provoke anyone to anger.  Rather, I trust we will consider how God expects us to live in the face of privileges that we don’t enjoy, while considering those we do. May we always seek the good of others above our own. May we humble ourselves in the way Jesus did as He left His heavenly privileges behind. And may we extend mercy to those undeserving, knowing that we ourselves could not take our next breath without God’s infinite, undeserved, mercy extended to us. 

The Call (a poem of focus…)

The Call (a poem of focus…)

The Call of a follower of Jesus does NOT include obsessing with everything around us that seems to counter the way we would like the world to go.  If you are there, you’ve lost the joy and peace of your call from the God of the universe, as my poem below attempts to remind us:
_______

If we fall 
For what we see
We’ve lost the call
That is ours to be

“Pick up your cross”
Were His words to us.
Not look around
To gripe and fuss

A simple call
“…and follow Me.”
But hard it is
When obsessed are we 

So take your eyes
Off all that’s wrong
And turn your mind
To what’s unseen

When life is lived
As Jesus did
What gripes you now
Will soon be rid

Our minds will seek
The Call of Life
The Way of Truth
Away from strife.

So focus our minds
On what’s unseen
Priorities will shift
From now to then

What lasts will call
Not fleeting things
Eternal will rise
Over temporal flings

Our neighbors’ needs
Will waken our thoughts
As their souls cry out
We’ll connect the dots 

So trust and obey
This is our call
No matter if
It’s big or small

“So we fix our eyes not on what is seen, but on what is unseen, since what is seen is temporary, but what is unseen is eternal.” 2 Corinthians 4:18 

When our minds are focused on the unseen, our priorities will shift to eternal over temporal; lasting over fleeting.  And that which lasts forever, the souls of our fellow man, will be our priority, versus those things that merely satisfy (or anger) for a moment or two.